DMA HOW-TO: The Basics of Arduino Connections

By Vince Matthews

Arduino is an electrical engineering platform that allows you to build almost anything. Want to make a robot that will alert you if an intruder enters your room? How about a light that automatically turns on when you come home? Or a video camera that starts recording remotely from an app on your smartphone? Arduino makes it all possibile.

Connections covered: Pushbutton to GND; Pushbutton to 5V; Pushbutton to 12V; Using Internal Pullup; Trimmer or Potentiometer; Photoresistor; Optocoupled inputs; Connect a LED; Dual LEDs or bi-color LED; Connect a Lamp (DC Low Voltage); LED clusters; Connect a Relay; Connect a Mosfet; Connect an Audio Amplifier; and Connect a Buzzer.
Download the Arduino Connections PDF Set 1-3.

Connections covered: Connect a Triac; Connect a Speaker; Connect a DC Motor; Connect a RGB Led Strip; Connect an Encoder; Bi-Directional Voltage Level Converter 3.3V to 5V; Bi-Directional Voltage Level Converter 3.3V to 5V with voltage divider; TTL / CMOS converter; and TTL / CMOS converter (6 inputs/outputs).
Download the Arduino Connections PDF Set 4-6.

Engineering the Future
Arduino is the most popular open-source platform for prototyping electronic gadgets and gizmos. Part hardware and software platform, Arduino utilizes the Wiring development platform. Wiring is an open-source electronics prototyping platform composed of a programming language, an integrated development environment (IDE) and a single-board microcontroller.

But before you build an LED array or connect a temperature sensor, you need to understand the basics of connecting Arduino first. In this HOW-TO we’ll provide you with guides for basic Arduino connections.

Arduino Building Tips
If you’re just getting started with Arduino, there are a few basics that will help your projects really shine:

  • A Clean Workspace An uncluttered workspace will help you keep your parts and project in order.
  • Good Tools and Guidance Your soldering gun should be in good working order and cleaned occasionally. (Remember to get your parents’ permission to use any tools.)
  • Research Before you build make sure you’ve researched your project and the materials you’ll need to complete it.
  •  
    Creative Tech Camp
    Arduino projects are showing the world just how creative you can be with electronics. You don’t have to have a tech cave or be an engineer at Apple to make something cool. Want to learn how to build things with Arduino? Digital Media Academy can give you the guidance you need to get started with an electrical engineering camp like the Robotics and Electrical Engineering w/ Arduino camp.

    (PDFs: Pighixx)